Medical marijuana to treat PTSD? Army personnel form MMJ advisory board

Dr Bob Melamede & Cliff Perry
Dr Bob Melamede & Cliff Perry

In September, Colorado’s health department rejected the use of medical marijuana to treat post-traumatic stress disorder, a common affliction for veterans. But that doesn’t mean the military and MMJ have been divorced once and for all. Cannabis Science, a Colorado Springs marijuana pharmaceutical company, has formed a military advisory board featuring military officials to advocate for easing restrictions on injured veterans who want to use marijuana for relief.

The advisory board will be comprised of retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Sullivan and other folks who know there way around the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and the Department of Health and Human Services. As Sullivan noted in a release, “The military advisory board is committed to ensuring service members, veterans and families who are dealing with psychological health conditions such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and traumatic brain injury (TBI) challenges have access to all options of quality treatments available.” According to Sullivan, cannabis has been proven to help veterans struggling with chronic and phantom limb pain, sleep disturbance, brain injuries, PTSD, anxiety and depression.

The effort is the brainchild of Cannabis Science president Robert Melamede, PhD., a University of Colorado at Colorado Springs professor and longtime proponent of the “Endocannabinoid System,” the concept that marijuana contains components that regulate many different body functions. While “Dr. Bob” has been an outspoken critic of the medical industry’s refusal to recognize pot as a medicine, going up against the military industrial complex could be a whole different ballgame.

The advisory board’s first plan of attack? Early next year, Sullivan says the group will be asking the health department to reconsider its rejection of PTSD as a condition for which medical marijuana can be recommended. While state health officials are not known to be a flexible bunch, who knows: Sullivan and his military colleagues may just have the firepower needed to state a coup.

By: Joel Warner

Pot Dispensary Donates Food By The Ton

Phil Hicks leans of Second Harvest food Bank

Granny Purps stocked Second Harvest pantry with nearly 11,000 pounds of food donated by medical marijuana customers

Phil Hicks has discovered the secret to turning a Second Harvest Food Bank fundraiser into a raging success in Santa Cruz: Medical marijuana packaged in a pre-rolled joint.

The co-owner of Granny Purps, a medical marijuana dispensary on 41st Avenue, found offering a joint propels the motivation factor to epic proportions.

The dispensary would give one joint to people who brought in four cans of food. (There were limits on the promotion, of course.)

“We literally gave away 2,000 doobies,” said Hicks on Monday. “You could raid your mom’s fridge and come up big time.”

Granny Purps, a mom-and-pop pot shop with a staff of eight, was one of the leaders in the county in number of pounds donated to the food bank this holiday season. Since Nov. 1, the dispensary has donated nearly 11,000 pounds of food.

As of Dec. 22, the total donated is 10,200 pounds said Hicks. But there are three more over-flowing barrels filled to the top that still need to be picked up. And each barrel weighs between 250 to 300 pounds.

And the bigger organizations in the county were no match for Granny Purps.

“They called and told me I was competing with Dominican Hospital and Safeway,” he said. “Not the Safeway across the street, Safeway stores of Santa Cruz County—all of them.”

This year, Second Harvest’s goal was to collect more than 2 million pounds of food. The group feeds an estimated 50,000 Santa Cruz County hungry residents each month, half of them are children.

“They are definitely champions,” said Danny Keith, chief development officer for Second Harvest. “For being one independent business and not participating in the past, to come out of the gate and be raising over 10,000 pounds of food is a phenomenal feat.”

Keith said Granny Purps found an effective way to engage their customers.

“It is Santa Cruz County, so you’ve got an eclectic mix of businesses,” he said. “It just goes to show if the owners of the business are focused on a goal and have a product the customers want, it’s going to help out a lot of families in the county.”

Hicks said it’s the patients who made it happen, and he gives them all the credit.

“1,900 patients—that’s what it’s all about,” he said.

And most of them, Hicks knows by name. He greets each person who enters the dispensary by name as he checks their identification.

And most of the regulars—Hicks said about half of the patients are regulars—brought in some canned food.

Hicks said one woman who was moving out of the area brought in an enormous amount of food. She brought in 25-pound bags of rice and tons of cans, but declined the offer of the joints.

“I told her to take the pre-rolls,” said Hicks. “She was gonna need them for her move.”

Another gentleman, he said, brought in 20 6-pound cans of fruit cocktail.

“When we started this, there were literally five cans of food in the single barrel for two weeks straight,” said Hicks.

It was that empty barrel that spurred the need for a promotion. Since it started,  “We pretty much averaged a barrel a day,” said Hicks. 

Monday afternoon, Hicks was still fielding calls for the promotion, which ended on Friday. But that doesn’t need to stop folks from bringing in donations. He’s still happy to take them.

“Bring it in,” he said.

RUTH SCHNEIDER

Santa Cruz Patch

Arizona Police Can Do Little To Prepare For States New Pot Law

arizona passes medical marijuana law

With state health officials still designing rules to regulate the cultivation, distribution and possession of medical marijuana, police departments in Arizona say there is little they can do to prepare to enforce the law until those guidelines are complete.

Until then, police officials are working with local governments to craft zoning laws that prevent clusters of marijuana dispensaries from popping up in the same areas, and they are taking other measured steps to ensure that Arizona does not repeat mistakes other states have made in regulating medical marijuana.

Beyond researching the experiences of other states, Arizona law-enforcement agencies are largely silent about what one of the biggest changes in the history of the state’s drug laws will mean to officers who have spent careers presuming that anyone smoking pot is breaking the law.

“It’s going to be a cultural shift for them to understand the difference between the criminal possession of marijuana and the approved medicinal possession,” Tucson police Capt. Mike Gillooly said. “They’ll have to work through that training we provide them to make that distinction between the two.”

There was an inherent prejudice among Colorado law officers about marijuana when that state first legalized medical marijuana in 2000, said Brian Vicente, a Colorado attorney and executive director of Sensible Colorado, an advocacy organization for medical-marijuana patients. Police often confiscated marijuana and charged legitimate medical-marijuana cardholders, Vicente said.

Kostas Kalaitzidis, a Pinal county attorney’s spokesman, said while the new law allows certain legal uses, it does not give carte blanche to illicit marijuana users.

“This new law will allow people to transport or possess small amounts of marijuana based on a permit, but really, that does not really stop us from prosecuting marijuana-related crimes,” Kalaitzidis said. “That is an important distinction.”

For police and prosecutors in Arizona, the new concept of approved use initially will be put to the test in two areas:
Drugged driving

– What the act says: As with prescription drugs, drivers can be charged with driving under the influence if it is determined that they are impaired. Drivers who have marijuana metabolites in their blood may not be charged with DUI if an officer cannot prove they are impaired.

– What law enforcement says: Some police fear that marijuana cardholders will treat marijuana like drivers treat other prescription drugs. “(Driving under the influence) is going to be OK in the eyes of society because they were (recommended) marijuana,” said Sgt. Paul White, a drug-recognition expert with the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.

– What attorneys say: “A medical-marijuana card just cannot be mistaken for a get-out-of-jail-free card. It’s not an excuse to break the law,” said Jordan Rose, whose Scottsdale law firm has represented businesses and non-profits that want to participate in the medical-marijuana program.

Rose said the Legislature should determine a standard measurement for marijuana impairment. Colorado lawmakers plan to introduce a similar bill early next year.
Possession

– What the act says: The Arizona Medical Marijuana Act permits licensed physicians to recommend medical marijuana for patients with debilitating medical conditions, including cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and Alzheimer’s disease. The act shields medical-marijuana patients from arrest for possessing marijuana, as long as they do not have more than the 2 1/2 ounces. It also protects caregivers as long as they do not have more than the allowed amount for up to five qualifying patients.

– What law enforcement says: “If they are (recommended) medical marijuana, they’re not going to suffer any consequences,” White said. “I think the most concerning thing for law enforcement is going to be the caregivers. They’re going to be the ones working with multiple patients.” They will possess medical marijuana for each patient, White noted, meaning “we’re going to have legal dope dealers.”

– What attorneys say: Law enforcement should treat medical-marijuana possession the same way as prescription medication, said Jamal Allen, a marijuana defense attorney in Chandler. Patients should not be charged if they have no more than the allowed amount and they have a valid medical-marijuana card, he said.

The Arizona Department of Health Services’ computer system will track how much marijuana each patient has purchased in a two-week period. Dispensaries and law enforcement will be allowed to access the system. If patients have more than 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana on them, patients and the dispensaries they purchased the marijuana from will face charges, Rose said.

Whether police are working through possession charges, allegations of driving under the influence or determining if someone is authorized to grow marijuana on their property, law-enforcement officials say making those decisions will take time for investigators. With many of these situations likely falling to street cops instead of detectives, administrators say the burden could disproportionally fall on law-enforcement personnel who need to be on patrol instead of working through the new law’s ambiguities.

Police will have just a small window of time to get up to speed: they must prepare between April, when health officials formalize regulations, and sometime this summer when dispensaries begin distributing marijuana.

“It’s something obviously we’re going to roll out pretty quick,” Gillooly said of training on the new law. “There are some very distinct black-and-white issues and some gray areas that provide some challenges for our officers.”

Source: azcentral.com
Author: JJ Hensley and Michelle Ye Hee Lee
Copyright: 2010 azcentral.com

Note To CPAC: Have A Pot Session


Pat Robertson and Vice President Joe Biden have provided conservatives an opportunity to start a conversation about marijuana legalization. Robertson came out earlier this week favoring if not wholesale legalization of pot, then a reexamination of the current broken system of punishment and prison for possession. “I just believe that criminalizing marijuana, criminalizing the possession of a few ounces of pot, that kind of thing, its costing us a fortune and it’s ruining young people,” Robertson declared on his program “The 700 Club.” Robertson’s remarks are cause for all conservatives to perk up their ears as it marks the first time a prominent conservative — not libertarian — figure has endorsed legalization. On the other side of the aisle, Biden was asked to respond to Robertson’s remarks and reverted to language that has been in use for decades. Biden called pot a “gateway drug” and said he doesn’t agree that legalization is the way to go. “I think it woul be a mistake to legalize,” the Veep declared.

Not surprisingly, Biden missed an opportunity, one which organizers of the upcoming Conservative Political Action Conference might want to capitalize on. Here’s why: The effort to lift the ban on marijuana may have been dealt a setback in California when the legalization ballot initiative there failed to pass in November. But the issue isn’t going away any time soon. In fact the opposite is the case as more and more states take up partial legalization of “medical” marijuana . Those conversations are happening in swing states like Pennsylvania and blue states like New York. These are places where conservative politicians need to be able to appeal to independents and younger, less rigidly dogmatic voters. Plus, legalization is a great subject both for its crime and punishment aspect and its fiscal implications. After all, if pot were legalized it would certainly be heavily taxed and right about now state capitols need as many new revenue streams as possible. In addition, conservatives, as Robertson proves once again, have a habit of looking at crime and punishment issues like illegal drugs, parole and recidivism in innovative and creative ways in order to find new solutions.

Biden’s answer to the question was old hat indicating that Democrats aren’t ready to evolve on the issue. Republicans should beat them to the punch and there’s no better labratory for new ideas than the annual CPAC gathering. Conservative leaders and politicians will gather with thousands of the faithful, in Washington in February where much of the focus will be on 2012 and the rise of presidential contenders. It would serve the purposes of the conservative movement and those who want to run for president to start a conversation about legalization.

Source: nypost.com
Author: Abby Wisse Schachter
Copyright: 2010 NYP Holdings, Inc.

IRS Auditing Oakland’s Biggest Pot Dispensary

Harbor Side Steve DeAngelo

In an ominous portent of the clash between federal and state law over medical marijuana, the IRS is auditing the Bay Area’s largest medical pot dispensary, Harborside Health Center, The Bay Citizen has learned.

Steve DeAngelo, executive director of Harborside, said in an interview today that the IRS initiated the audit a few months ago and it has not finished. DeAngelo said he wasn’t worried about opening the dispensary’s books, saying, “Our whole model is being compliant and transparent; I don’t have anything to hide from the IRS.”

An IRS spokesman said the agency doesn’t confirm or deny whether audits are taking place.

However, a Nov. 15 letter that Harborside sent to Sen. Barbara Boxer asking for tweaks in tax laws that can result in near-crippling taxes on pot dispensaries, conveys a bit more consternation about the effects of federal tax law on its operations.

“Harborside Health Center currently employs approximately 80 individuals in Oakland, CA,” the letter reads. “Unless we can change this law, these jobs are in jeopardy.”

Clean and well lighted, Harborside has exploded in popularity with 58,000 members and regular media coverage. The dispensary brings in around $20 million in revenue each year, likely the most in the Bay Area.

The IRS audits large companies on a regular basis, but in looking at Harborside, DeAngelo believes the agency will be raising questions about a section of tax code known as 280e. The section, which was aimed at nabbing drug kingpins, prohibits companies from deducting any expenses if they are “trafficking in controlled substances.”

“Our contention is that what were doing is legal and not trafficking, and it’s not appropriate to apply it to us,” said DeAngelo. “This is an industry-wide issue.”

Bob McEligot, a partner at the San Francisco tax firm Calegari & Morris, explained that normal companies just pay tax on their profits after deducting expenses such as payroll and rent. But if the IRS found a medical pot dispensary to be trafficking in controlled substances, then “they would be paying on their gross income with no deductions at all,” said McEligot.

The difference could be enormous. A company the size of Harborside could be paying taxes at a rate of about 35 percent without being allowed to deduct expenses.

Luigi Zamorra, chief financial officer at Harborside, said that tax code section 280e is antiquated and should be changed to account for the new medical marijuana industry.

“This law was enacted a long time ago before there was a medical cannabis industry, and it was written as a back door punishment for thug-like drug dealers,” said Zamarra. “We would like a full exemption.”

Zamarra has come up with a method of accounting that allows Harborside to deduct almost all its expenses except for cost of the actual transaction in which money is exchanged for marijuana. It’s detailed in an article entitled “Medical Cannabis Dispensaries: Minimizing the Cost of IRC Section 280E.”

The seminal tax case on the issue was Californians Helping to Alleviate Medical Problems Inc. v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, in which a judge ruled in 2007 that a pot dispensary could deduct expenses from all of its other activities apart from buying and selling marijuana, such as care-giving, yoga classes, rent and the like. You can read the opinion here.

Zamarra acknowledged that his accounting methods push the envelope beyond that case. “I anticipate a long road before an agreement is reached,” with the IRS, he said.

baycitizen.org
Zusha Elinson

Large marijuana growing operation busted in Portland, Gresham Hundreds of plants and pounds of pot seized


A regional drug task force has broken up an alleged large-scale marijuana growing operation, arresting four adults and seizing four vehicles, approximately 300 mature growing marijuana plants, 100 pounds of processed marijuana, scales and packaging material.

As a result of these arrests, two children of the arrested subjects between the age of 4 and 8 were taken into protective custody and released to Oregon Department of Human Services.

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office Special Investigative Unit and the Regional Organized Crime Narcotics task force executed search warrants at two residences at around 8 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 21. They were located at 2915 N.E. Rocky Butte Drive, Portland, and 17717 N.E. Pacific Drive, Gresham.

Taken into custody were: Tu Ngoc Tran, 36; Minh Ngoc Le, 49; Minaty Nguyen, 32; and Huy Nguyen, 36.

According to investigators, the suspects used medical marijuana cards along with fraudulent documents to disguise their marijuana growing activities from law enforcement authorities.

The vehicles seized included a Porsche Cayenne SUV, an Acura MDX SUV, a BMV M3 and a Lexus 300.

By Jim Redden

The Portland Tribune

By Jim Redden

The Portland Tribune

Colorado doctor accused of faulty medical-pot recommendation, may lose license


Colorado doctor accused of faulty medical-pot recommendation, may lose license

A doctor accused of approving medical marijuana for a woman six months pregnant could become the first Colorado physician to lose his license for a sub-standard marijuana recommendation.

Dr. Manuel De Jesus Aquino is accused of recommending marijuana in January to a 20-year-old woman at a Denver dispensary. In a formal complaint filed last week by the state attorney general’s office on behalf of the Colorado Medical Board, Aquino is accused of not performing a thorough review of the woman’s medical history, not listening to her heart or lungs, not asking her to come back for follow-up care and not taking any notes on the 3-minute evaluation other than on her marijuana-recommendation form.

The doctor did not ask whether she was pregnant, and the woman, who was 28 weeks along, did not volunteer the information, the complaint states. When the woman gave birth in April, her child tested positive for marijuana and had “initial feeding difficulties,” the complaint says.

The complaint against Aquino was first reported by Solutions, a health-policy news website produced by professional journalists at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs and funded by private foundations.

“Pregnancy is a contraindication for the use of medical marijuana,” the complaint states, later stating that Aquino “failed to meet the generally accepted standard of medical practice.”

Colorado law requires doctors to have a “bona-fide” relationship with patients to whom they recommend marijuana.

Aquino has been a doctor since 1974 and licensed in Colorado since 2007, according to a profile of him posted on the Colorado Division of Registrations’ website. His license has been suspended pending the outcome of the medical board’s proceedings, according to the complaint.

Aquino’s attorney, Sheila Meer, could not be reached for comment Tuesday evening. She told Solutions that Aquino would respond to the charges within the 30 days allowed.

“It would be premature to talk about it until then,” Meer told the website.

Aquino specializes in medical-marijuana recommendations, according to the online profile.

In July, Aurora police arrested a doctor named Manuel Aquino-Villaman on allegations of writing shoddy marijuana recommendations to two undercover Aurora police officers.

There is only one doctor named Manuel Aquino listed in Colorado’s physician licensing records, though no one was available to confirm Tuesday evening whether Aquino and Aquino-Villaman are the same person.

See the complaint. Read articles by the health-policy news website Solutions. healthpolicysolutions.org

Colorado doctor accused of faulty medical-pot recommendation, may lose license

Read more: Colorado doctor accused of faulty medical-pot recommendation, may lose license – The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news/marijuana/ci_16916444#ixzz18qfzDOVs
Read The Denver Post’s Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

A doctor accused of approving medical marijuana for a woman six months pregnant could become the first Colorado physician to lose his license for a sub-standard marijuana recommendation.

Dr. Manuel De Jesus Aquino is accused of recommending marijuana in January to a 20-year-old woman at a Denver dispensary. In a formal complaint filed last week by the state attorney general’s office on behalf of the Colorado Medical Board, Aquino is accused of not performing a thorough review of the woman’s medical history, not listening to her heart or lungs, not asking her to come back for follow-up care and not taking any notes on the 3-minute evaluation other than on her marijuana-recommendation form.

The doctor did not ask whether she was pregnant, and the woman, who was 28 weeks along, did not volunteer the information, the complaint states. When the woman gave birth in April, her child tested positive for marijuana and had “initial feeding difficulties,” the complaint says.

The complaint against Aquino was first reported by Solutions, a health-policy news website produced by professional journalists at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs and funded by private foundations.

“Pregnancy is a contraindication for the use of medical marijuana,” the complaint states, later stating that Aquino “failed to meet the generally accepted standard of medical practice.”

Colorado law requires doctors to have a “bona-fide” relationship with patients to whom they recommend marijuana.

Aquino has been a doctor since 1974 and licensed in Colorado since 2007, according to a profile of him posted on the Colorado Division of Registrations’ website. His license has been suspended pending the outcome of the medical board’s proceedings, according to the complaint.

Aquino’s attorney, Sheila Meer, could not be reached for comment Tuesday evening. She told Solutions that Aquino would respond to the charges within the 30 days allowed.

“It would be premature to talk about it until then,” Meer told the website.

Aquino specializes in medical-marijuana recommendations, according to the online profile.

In July, Aurora police arrested a doctor named Manuel Aquino-Villaman on allegations of writing shoddy marijuana recommendations to two undercover Aurora police officers.

There is only one doctor named Manuel Aquino listed in Colorado’s physician licensing records, though no one was available to confirm Tuesday evening whether Aquino and Aquino-Villaman are the same person.

See the complaint. Read articles by the health-policy news website Solutions. healthpolicysolutions.org

By John Ingold
The Denver Post

By John Ingold
The Denver Post

Fibromyalgia Chronic Pain And Medical Marijuana

What is Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia yielding a variety of symptoms and particularly hard to treat. Those persons who endure fibromyalgia only 35 to 40 percent get little comfort from medications which are provided to treat the condition. Even among the strong controversy surrounding the use of medical marijuana some patients are giving it a try legally or illegally to help their struggle with pain.

Dr. Stuart Silverman, a clinical professor of medicine and rheumatology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, state that history and ancedotally, marijuana has been used as a pain killer.

We are all aware that are bodies produce natural painkillers named endorphins, however they also produce another substance that can set off pain relief in the system named endocannabinoid. The system appears to be a major player in several procedures within the body which includes how we perceive pain. Marijuana contains cannabinoids which are alike the natural endorphins in our bodies.

Fibromyalgia patients usually witness wide spread pain throughout their body, however usually they require many medications for other symptoms which could include hard time sleeping and restless leg syndrome. Nevertheless, marijuana possibly can treat numerous symptoms and there are patients who do have results.

Logic then dictates why should not fibromyalgia patients have the opportunity to try marijuana if it is legal for medical uses in the state where they reside.

According to Dr. Silverman and other arbitrators there are two problems with its use. First off its complicated natural substance includes 60 various compounds with possible side effects some which possibly could cause a reaction between each other. The second problem is the amounts of the different compounds can differ by batch, due to the fact that marijuana is grown and not synthesized.

Dr. Silverman is hopeful that synthetic medications found on single compounds in cannabis could at some time help fibromyalgia patients. This is after controlled randomized clinic trails are done. His presented argument is that the real thing which is available today is just way to uncertain.

Dr. Mark Ware, assistant professor in family medicine and anesthesia at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and the executive director of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids, states that they believe there most likely is a part for that type of compounds, cannabinoids in general, and it is just a matter of figuring out how to use it in practice.

Recently Dr. Ware had published a study demonstrating that one alike compound nabilone (cesamet) helps fibromyalgia patients get better sleep. It had been more efficient amitriptyline which is a tricyclic antidepressant usually prescribed to fibromyalgia patients to alleviate pain and help sleep. Previously a study published a couple of years back discovered nabilone aided in decreasing pain and anxiety in fibromyalgia patients.

Nabilone (synthetic analog of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) THCTHC usually regarded as the active ingredient in cannabis. The FDA authorized the drug in 1985 for the treatment of nausea in cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy.

The only other cannabis based medication currently on the market in the United States is dronabinol, which is marketed as Marinol in the United States which is FDA approved in the treatment of nausea and vomiting in chemo relation. It is yet to be tested officially in fibromyalgia patients. A patient had received a prescription for Marinol in 2006.

The patient stated the medication had made them even more exhausted and did not remain in their system long. They had stayed with the drug due to the fact it was supplemented with marijuana, just not a lot of times during the day. There are times when it is not used at all for a day or week or even a month.

A third of cannabis based medicine, Staivex, is currently under clinical trails in the United States for the treatment of cancer pain. The application of the drug is sprayed under the tongue or into the cheek and contains THC and cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive compound located in cannabis that alleviates inflammation and pain and could possibly decrease side effects of THC like anxiety along with a number of other compounds.

Dr. Ethan Russo, a senior medical advisor to GW Pharmaceuticals that manufactures Sativex, and a study physician for the United States clinical trails in progress for cancer treatments state it is very likely that cannabis based medications could aide those who suffer fibromyalgia based on available science. He is also optimistic Sativex will receive FDA approval for the treatment of cancer pain in 2013. While a hypothetical foundation Sativex possibly aiding fibromyalgia symptoms is very sound, it is known to be very useful with neuropathic pain and sleep disruption in numerous conditions, its final benefit in fibromyalgia can only be proven in a significant useful manner through formal randomized clinical trails.

Dr. Ware states that right now that persons with fibromyalgia are receiving no benefits from their current treatments may wish to discuss with their physician about using Nabilone. Many physicians are unaware that the cannabinoids are in existence.

Be aware that these medications do carry side effects. Most common is dizziness, dry mouth and drowsiness.

Federal law in Canada gives patients permission for the use of medical marijuana with a physicians support it can not be prescribed due to the fact it is not a approved drug in Canada. The patient goes through the application process and the drug is delivered straight to the patient. It is grown under controlled conditions of the government.

Dr. Ware comments that he does have patients with a span of pain syndromes who have had all other treatments not work and for who herbal cannabis had been the only real choice to maintain their symptoms. In those cases he will aide the patient to obtain the card required for authorization to possess the drug.

However, in the United States the legalization of medical marijuana is left determined by each individual state. Currently it is approved in fourteen states one of which is Michigan. The rules and regulations do vary by each state. Yet still many patients who are using medical marijuana are still fearful of legal ramifications.

Today 90% of persons who suffer with fibromyalgia use alternative treatments. Below are listed some the more popular ones used and also used by CAM.

Chiropractic

Praised by millions of suffers today is chiropractic treatment for their fibromyalgia. Chiropractic care has been demonstrated to decrease the agonizing pain and joint stiffness of fibromyalgia. Spinal adjustments of the spine and pelvis by hands on adjustments are usually used. As their joint functioning becomes better patients have witnessed a decrease in pain and in various cases total elimination of the pain. As the pain has been decreased or eliminated it has also has aided the patient in improved sleep, fatigue and depression. Chiropractic care has aided thousands with fibromyalgia including Retired Brigadier General Becky Halstead , the very first woman General in the United States Army to lead command in Iraq. She had endured fibromyalgia while in service. She had stated that the treatments and nutritional advice from her chiropractor had aided in treating her fibromyalgia and overall made her feel much better on a daily basis.

Acupuncture

Studies are finding that acupuncture treatments may be beneficial in some patients with fibromyalgia. In some patients the acupuncture has been known to last for weeks at a time in pain reduction. However, it does not work for all patients. It is dependent upon the person.

Massage Therapy

Swedish and Deep Tissue massage is the top rated massages for fibromyalgia patients. Patients have shown a 38% decrease of pain symptoms after a thirty minute massage. They also noted they had less problems for sleeping.

Source: allvoices.com
Author: Debbie Nicholson

Remember Marijuana POWs This Holiday Season

As the holiday season gets into full swing, I am again reminded to count my blessings. One of the most precious blessings is my freedom. I can go where I want, eat what I want, watch what I want and so on. We all need to be aware of that freedom, because many of our peers have lost theirs. The “War on Drugs” has created victims, casualties and POWs, in ever increasing numbers.

One of those POWs is from our Big Island “ganja ohana”, Rev Roger Christie. He sits in the Federal Detention Center in Honolulu, held without bail for more than five months. This FDC is designed for short-term detention, and has no outdoor yard. Roger hasn’t seen the sun or felt the balmy trades in 164 days. His fifth motion for bail was denied by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco recently, and his trial is not until April 26, 2011.

I spent part of my Sunday looking for interesting articles to mail Roger. He has limited access to information, or even the law library, and needless to say a lot of time on his hands. I try to mail him an envelope weekly, so that he has something to look forward to at “mail call.”

I’ve sent letters of support to two other heroes of the reform movement, Marc Emery and Rev Eddy Lepp.

Taking a few minutes out of our day to write a letter is easy, and so beneficial to those POWs. Share a photo, or a story about your life. Something, anything to help break up the monotony of the day.

There is a web site which has information about other people in jail for medical cannabis related crimes.

http://www.medicalmarijuanaofamerica.com/pows.html

Below are the mailing addresses for Roger, Marc and Eddy. Please find some time to write them and share some aloha.

Thank you.

Matt Rifkin

Rev Roger Christie
99279-022
PO Box 30080
Honolulu, HI 96820

Marc Scott Emery
40252-086
D Ray James CI
PO Box 2000
Folkston, GA 31537

Charles Eddy Lepp
90157-011
FDC Lompoc
3705 West Farm Road
Lompoc, CA 93436

Dangers of synthetic marijuana available to public


For some, Miley Cyrus smoking salvia on her 18th birthday is simply a case of “if your friends jumped off a cliff, would you do it, too?” and thus easily dismissed from the minds of parents as unimportant.

It may be time to give this incident a little more thought — because your teens and preteens are.

In a culture that is dominated by stars — teen and otherwise — acting out, parents should be aware that just because they realize something is stupid doesn’t mean their children think the same.

Cyrus — who has been held up as a child and teen star and, therefore, very cool — was smoking a substance that is actually legal to purchase until the end of December, when the Drug Enforcement Administration has ordered it temporarily removed from shelves. Other names for the synthetic marijuana are Spice or K2.

According to the DEA Web site, “The products containing these THC-like synthetic cannabinoids are marketed as ‘legal’ alternatives to marijuana and are being sold over the Internet and in tobacco and smoke shops, drug paraphernalia shops and convenience stores. These synthetic cannabinoids alone or spiked on plant material have the potential to be extremely harmful due to their method of manufacture and high pharmacological potency. DEA has been made aware that smoking these synthetic cannabinoids for the purpose of achieving intoxication and experiencing the psychoactive effects is identified as a reason for emergency room visits and calls to poison control centers.”

Although Spice (and other similar synthetics) is relatively new on the market, there have already been 1,500 reports to Poison Control Centers in the United States as of September.

So many times parents are surprised by their children’s actions because the elders spend so much time talking about what they believe is right and wrong. Shouldn’t their kids just absorb that common sense and, hopefully, learn from the past mistakes of those who went before?

That scenario would be nice if it ever worked.

A really good way to find out what your children are thinking is to ask them. Then make your relationship a safe place for them to tell you the truth.

The Courier plans a series of articles in the new year to reveal the dangers and consequences of drug use experienced by people who live in the Gila Valley.

By Aimee Staten