Study: Marijuana Effective in Treating Crohn’s Disease

The federal government steadfastly refuses to acknowledge the therapeutic utility of the cannabis plant, stating as recently as this past July that it possesses:

“a high potential for abuse; … no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States; … [and] lacks accepted safety for use under medical supervision. …[T]here are no adequate and well-controlled studies proving (marijuana’s) efficacy; the drug is not accepted by qualified experts. … At this time, the known risks of marijuana use have not been shown to be outweighed by specific benefits in well-controlled clinical trials that scientifically evaluate safety and efficacy.”

Yet, almost daily, scientific journals from around the globe expose the absurdity of the administration’s longstanding ‘flat Earth’ position regarding the medical use of cannabis.

Below is a just published abstract from yet another scientific study establishing the safety and efficacy of cannabis. Your government will state categorically that studies like these don’t exist. Your government is lying to you.

Treatment of Crohn’s disease with cannabis: an observational study
via PubMed
Isr Med Assoc J. 2011 Aug;13(8):455-8.

BACKGROUND: The marijuana plant cannabis is known to have therapeutic effects, including improvement of inflammatory processes. However, no report of patients using cannabis for Crohn’s disease (CD) was ever published.

OBJECTIVES: To describe the effects of cannabis use in patients suffering from CD.

METHODS: In this retrospective observational study we examined disease activity, use of medication, need for surgery, and hospitalization before and after cannabis use in 30 patients (26 males) with CD. Disease activity was assessed by the Harvey Bradshaw index for Crohn’s disease.

RESULTS: Of the 30 patients 21 improved significantly after treatment with cannabis. The average Harvey Bradshaw index improved from 14 +/- 6.7 to 7 +/- 4.7 (P < 0.001). The need for other medication was significantly reduced. Fifteen of the patients had 19 surgeries during an average period of 9 years before cannabis use, but only 2 required surgery during an average period of 3 years of cannabis use.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of cannabis use in Crohn’s disease in humans. The results indicate that cannabis may have a positive effect on disease activity, as reflected by reduction in disease activity index and in the need for other drugs and surgery. Prospective placebo-controlled studies are warranted to fully evaluate the efficacy and side effects of cannabis in CD.

NYC POLICE COMISH ISSUES MEMO ON FRISK POLICY AND MARIJUANA!

 


In a surprising memo(see below), New York Police Comissioner Ray Kelly has instructed his officers to not coerce citizens they stop into taking marijuana out of their pockets and thus in “public view,” which has led to the city’s staggering high pot bust totals over the last 15 years.

 

Last year, 50,383 New Yorkers were arrested for marijuana possession. The vast majority of those arrests are a result of the police’s stop-and-frisk policy. Critics have called for an end to these arrests for years. Recently, members of the City Council sponsored a resolution, joining the critical chorus. In the spring, bills were introduced in the legislature that would strike the language in New York’s decrim bill that allows for in “public view” arrests.

“The NYPD requires major reform,” says Queens College Prof. Harry Levine, who’s been one of the department’s most vocal critics. “This is a first step.”

NYC POLICE CHIEF KELLY’S MEMO

Frisk Policy, officers routinely tell suspects to empty their pockets and then, if marijuana is displayed, arrest them for having the drugs in public view, thereby pushing thousands of people toward criminality and into criminal justice system.

Critics said the commissioner’s memo, reported on Friday by WNYC, represented a major change of policy. “This will make a tremendous difference because tens of thousands of young people — predominately young people of color — will not be run through the system as criminals,” said Steven Banks, the attorney in chief at the Legal Aid Society, which has handled thousands of the cases.

Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, an advocacy group that has been challenging the Police Department’s marijuana-arrest policies, said the order was directing a significant change in the way the police deal with people they arrest for small amounts of marijuana.

Mr. Nadelmann said that there was evidence of “gross racial disparity” in the enforcement of the marijuana laws and that “this appears to represent a major step forward.”

Although the memo begins, “Questions have been raised about the processing of certain marihuana arrests,” a spokesman for the Police Department said that the order was not in response to any particular incident and that it did not represent any change in policy. It was intended merely to remind officers of existing procedures, he said.

The memo says, “A crime will not be charged to an individual who is requested or compelled to engage in the behavior that results in the public display of marihuana.” The act of displaying it, the order continues, must be “actively undertaken of the subject’s own volition.”

Under Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, the number of low-level marijuana arrests has increased significantly. Mr. Bloomberg’s office declined to comment on Mr. Kelly’s order, but in the past, mayoral aides have said such arrests helped fight more serious crime, like the violence that tends to trail drugs.

Harry G. Levine, a sociologist at Queens College who has researched the issue, said public defenders and legal aid lawyers who have defended thousands of these cases estimate that between two-thirds and three-fourths of people arrested on charges of possession of small amounts of marijuana displayed it at an officer’s request.

“The police stop them, search them and tell them to empty their pockets,” Professor Levine said. “They don’t know the law doesn’t allow that.”

According to Professor Levine, on average over the past 15 years, 54 percent of people arrested for marijuana possession in New York City were black, 33 percent were Latino and 12 percent were white. National studies tend to show that young whites use marijuana at higher rates than blacks and Latinos.

In a March appearance before the City Council, Mr. Kelly reiterated the Bloomberg administration’s position that arrests for having marijuana in public view have helped keep crime low.

In response to council members who were skeptical of the policy, he said, “If you think the law is not written correctly, then you should petition the State Legislature to change it.”

Hakeem Jeffries, a Democratic assemblyman from Brooklyn, and Mark Grisanti, a Republican senator from Buffalo, have since sponsored a bill that would downgrade open possession of small amounts of marijuana from a misdemeanor to a violation.

City Hall is opposed to changing the law.

In June, Frank Barry, a mayoral aide, said downgrading the offense would “encourage smoking in the streets and in our parks, reversing successful efforts to clean up neighborhoods and eliminate the open-air drug markets like we used to find in Washington Square Park.”

William Glaberson, Rob Harris and Kate Taylor contributed reporting.

 

Amid criticism about the way New York City police officers enforce marijuana laws, Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly issued a memo to commanders this week reiterating that officers are not to arrest people who have small amounts of marijuana in their possession unless it is in public view.

The New York Legislature decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana in the 1970s, making possession of 25 grams or less a violation of the law that in most cases would not bring a jail sentence. But possessing even small amounts of marijuana in public view remains a misdemeanor.

Just over 50,000 people were arrested on marijuana possession charges last year, a vast majority of them members of minorities and male. Critics say that as part of the Police Department’s stop-and-frisk policy, officers routinely tell suspects to empty their pockets and then, if marijuana is displayed, arrest them for having the drugs in public view, thereby pushing thousands of people toward criminality and into criminal justice system.

Critics said the commissioner’s memo, reported on Friday by WNYC, represented a major change of policy. “This will make a tremendous difference because tens of thousands of young people — predominately young people of color — will not be run through the system as criminals,” said Steven Banks, the attorney in chief at the Legal Aid Society, which has handled thousands of the cases.

Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, an advocacy group that has been challenging the Police Department’s marijuana-arrest policies, said the order was directing a significant change in the way the police deal with people they arrest for small amounts of marijuana.

Mr. Nadelmann said that there was evidence of “gross racial disparity” in the enforcement of the marijuana laws and that “this appears to represent a major step forward.”

Although the memo begins, “Questions have been raised about the processing of certain marihuana arrests,” a spokesman for the Police Department said that the order was not in response to any particular incident and that it did not represent any change in policy. It was intended merely to remind officers of existing procedures, he said.

The memo says, “A crime will not be charged to an individual who is requested or compelled to engage in the behavior that results in the public display of marihuana.” The act of displaying it, the order continues, must be “actively undertaken of the subject’s own volition.”

Under Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, the number of low-level marijuana arrests has increased significantly. Mr. Bloomberg’s office declined to comment on Mr. Kelly’s order, but in the past, mayoral aides have said such arrests helped fight more serious crime, like the violence that tends to trail drugs.

Harry G. Levine, a sociologist at Queens College who has researched the issue, said public defenders and legal aid lawyers who have defended thousands of these cases estimate that between two-thirds and three-fourths of people arrested on charges of possession of small amounts of marijuana displayed it at an officer’s request.

“The police stop them, search them and tell them to empty their pockets,” Professor Levine said. “They don’t know the law doesn’t allow that.”

According to Professor Levine, on average over the past 15 years, 54 percent of people arrested for marijuana possession in New York City were black, 33 percent were Latino and 12 percent were white. National studies tend to show that young whites use marijuana at higher rates than blacks and Latinos.

In a March appearance before the City Council, Mr. Kelly reiterated the Bloomberg administration’s position that arrests for having marijuana in public view have helped keep crime low.

In response to council members who were skeptical of the policy, he said, “If you think the law is not written correctly, then you should petition the State Legislature to change it.”

Hakeem Jeffries, a Democratic assemblyman from Brooklyn, and Mark Grisanti, a Republican senator from Buffalo, have since sponsored a bill that would downgrade open possession of small amounts of marijuana from a misdemeanor to a violation.

City Hall is opposed to changing the law.

In June, Frank Barry, a mayoral aide, said downgrading the offense would “encourage smoking in the streets and in our parks, reversing successful efforts to clean up neighborhoods and eliminate the open-air drug markets like we used to find in Washington Square Park.”

William Glaberson, Rob Harris and Kate Taylor contributed reporting.

Who is winning THE WAR ON DRUGS anyway — follow the money and…

by Craig “BUZZ” Bateman

 Let us stray for a moment from the tack of ideologues, who are stern upon their party lines, to discuss the matter of the War on Drugs. 

To my judgment, and to that of those resolute in right-minded thinking, the war on drugs must be analyzed not purely on the dubious pretext of morally relativistic ideology, but empirically withal, considering the omnipresent presupposition that the punishment must be congruent with the crime, and the cost not outweigh the benefit. This may be done with a relative ease, providing that the commonly accepted calculations on the matter are correct ¿ the federal government has spent approximately $10.25 trillion this year, $17.48 in the states, for an approximate total (respective of the time of calculation) of $27.7 trillion annually. This year 1.13 million individuals were arrested for drug offenses (584,393 for cannabis related violations), and 7,364 incarcerated, and 388,000 incarcerated. Therefore by simple mathematics each arrest should approximate to cost $24,513.27 (47,399.60 for marijuana offenses). 

Let us be compelled to recall, that this is not money generated by the great Deus ex Machina of the federal powers, but by the taxpayers of the nation. For the edification of those critics of such figures, asserted to be subject to the numerically distensible fingers of anti-drug war authors, I shall report that the aforementioned sums are those emitted from the circumspectly vocal mouths of Office of National Drug Control Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, and Federal Bureau of Investigation. Consequently the arrival of a decision on the matter of the drug problem is manifest in the figures, the U.S. Department of Transportation states, in a 1992 report, “There was no indication that cannabis itself was a cause of fatal crashes,” how therefore may two-thirds of our prison population be incarcerated for the possession of marijuana, whilst according to the NHTSA 33,808 persons die in alcohol-related driving fatalities per annum, and whose surviving first-time perpetrators must simply quarter a sum of money to the court, and glide blissfully back into the night. 

To my judgment, for which must be excused a brief beholding to a predisposition to chronomania, the ban set heavily upon cannabis use shall be recollected by us, and told of as we bridge the onset of our winter years, with the same jocular tonality as we recall the days of abolition. Our children shall wonder however such despotic constraints befell the mind of the American to be right ¿ that we were, in the olden days of the 2010s incapable of seeing reason, and attempting to find within ourselves a national pride great enough to confess that we have lead a failed war against the ‘menace’ of drugs; a war which rather struck its fist, with titan wrath, upon the individual and upon the American coffer, but was not suited to stop the forces of youthful misadventure and naiveté

Study Finds THC kills Cancer Cells (DEA will still arrest cancer patients smoking herb)

A recent study shows THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, kills cancer cells. This is just another reminder herb is medically relevant, and can help those who suffer from cancer among other ailments. Find out more specifics about the studies findings after the jump.

Simply put, “Medicinal marijuana oil made from cannabis buds, when ingested thrice daily, for two months, will destroy leukemia and cancer cells.”

Keep in mind that smoking marijuana leads to cancer-causing carcinogens (forgive the alliteration), but when taking the medical marijuana oil in various pastries can lead to the death of leukemia and cancer cells. The technical findings are “Plant-derived cannabinoids, including Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), induce apoptosis in leukemic cells, although the precise mechanism remains unclear.”

So they’re not really sure why the THC is killing leukemic cells, but they know it does. Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death.

This is great news, but you’re still going to jail if you get caught with a lot of marijuana.

Latest Studies Imply That Cannabinoids Are Protective Against Alcohol-Induced Brain Damage

 


The administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-211 decreases nerve cell death in an in vitro model of ethanol withdrawal, according to data published online in the journal of the Public Library of Science.

An international team of researchers from France and Spain assessed the anti-excitotoxic effects of the synthetic cannabinoid HU-211 in culture. Researchers demonstrated that cannabinoid administration protected neurons from cell death in an experimental model of ethanol withdrawal. By contrast, the administration of a cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant during ethanol withdrawal greatly increased cell death.

These observations show, for the first time, that the stimulation of the endocannabinoid system could be protective against the hyper-excitability developed during alcohol withdrawal,” investigators concluded. “By contrast, the blockade of the endocannabinoid system seems to be counterproductive during alcohol withdrawal.”

In humans, the abrupt cessation of alcohol in dependent subjects may be associated with tremor, delirium, brain damage, and death.

Separate pre-clinical studies have previously documented that administration of the non-psychotropic organic cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) in animals is neuroprotective against cerebral infarction and ethanol-induced neurotoxicity (alcohol poisoning).

In 2009 and 2010, a pair of studies conducted by investigators at the University of California at San Diego reported that the consumption of cannabis may offset certain alcohol-induced brain abnormalities, including the loss of white matter integrity and impaired memory, in human subjects with a history of both alcohol and marijuana use.


FORMER PRESIDENT CLINTON LABOR SECRETARY “ROBERT REICH” IS FOR POT LEGALIZATION

 

 

If he was going to change one federal regulation, Clinton cabinet member Robert Reich says he would “start by legalizing marijuana.” 

The former Labor Secretary added on the “Ask Me Anything” Reddit forum on Sept. 2 that he toked up with the former President .

“I’ve known him since he was 22,” Reich wrote. “At Oxford, as grad students, we didn’t inhale together.”

Reich first worked in the Carter  administration before landing a cabinet post with Clinton, from 1993-1996. Now he’s an accomplished author, professor and pundit.